How to 'sew' a Christmas card (or a dozen!) - with Tutorial

Tuesday, 25 November 2014



Is it possible to  'Sew' a Christmas card? 
Could I turn my compulsion to sew into something  apart from a dress?



And could that sewing compulsion be mass produced to make a decent batch of cards?



 

And it seems that I can! The latest experiment worked! This was a bit of a sewing revelation. I wanted to create something that didn't matter too much whether it was 'neat' or not. The lack of perfection, I hope, would add to the charm.




And in just a couple of hours I've created a decent batch! Enough to send to distant friends - and my blogging friends around the world! Hurray!



And it was very simple. A strip of velvet in the deepest burgundy, which sadly I've failed to photograph adequately. Then a piece of white cotton, an extra layer of sparkly organza, a nd a simple green triangle to finish them off. The biggest slog (and it wasn't too arduous,) was hand-sewing the star shaped sequins. Then I literally stitched the velvet sparkly 'wintery landscapes' on to the cards with my sewing machine. This was immensely satisfying, and so, so easy! For fuller details see the tutorial below.


My little 'photo shoot' turned out to be more complicated than stitching the cards!






I had an idea to create a snow scene - and used icing sugar. Which proved to be slightly crazy. Picture the scene - the cards, houses, white table cloth are precariously balanced on my stairs, because the stair window gets the morning sunlight. In one hand I am shaking icing sugar through a sieve, in the other I am trying to click the camera to 'capture the moment.' I'm kneeling on the stairs, my fingers are getting sticky and sugary, my beloved camera is at risk from icing sugar. And I'm thinking; "If anyone knocks on the door now, they're going to think I'm nuts."

And I failed to capture the 'sugar blizzard' on camera.
But I am fairly happy that I created a little sewing love to share with a lot of people!

Victoria



Tutorial


1. Stitch a strip of velvet to white cotton. (Or any fabric of your choice! Think winter!)
Top stitch sparkly organza along the seam. I deliberately kept the raw frayed edge. Looks a bit frosty! (Apologies for photo quality - all my sewing is done at night, in lighting that isn't great! And please don't mention the stem of a wine glass that has sneaked into this picture).


2. Cut the strip to a long rectangle.


3. Cut the rectangle into small oblongs. Use the size of your card as a guide. Cut Christmas tree triangles and pin.


4. Stitch the triangle trees in place with the machine. No need to be neat! These are tiny, it's a fiddle, Christmas cards aren't designed to last forever. Handstitch a couple of sequins.


5. Stitch each rectangle landscape directly to the front of your card, using your sewing machine. Sorry forgot to take a picture of this step. But honestly, it is as easy as it sounds.

6. Et Voila! Lots of cards, write a message of love, send it to a dear  friend, preferably someone who will say "Wow! Sewing!"








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8 comments :

  1. These cards are super sweet Victoria :) This can be a fun project to do with kids.

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  2. Love sewn cards, I do them all the time now I've realised how smashing they are. Yours look great, a real Winter scene!

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  3. Victoria, your Christmas cards are lovely. I love how you've varied the texture by using totally different fabrics, from organza to velvet.

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  4. I like the "folky" look of these cards. Wonderful job! Found you feature on "Threading My Way."

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  5. Great idea, I really like, not the typical boring Christmas card ...

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  6. Great idea, I really like, not the typical boring Christmas card ...

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment. I love hearing from you, and try to reply as often as I can, either here or by email. All views, tips, gratefully received...
Victoria

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